Christians 75% Less likely to Be Depressed

November 19, 2012
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A 20-year study published in the American Journal of Psychiatry found that Christian adults (both Catholics and Protestants) “had about one-fourth the risk of experiencing major depression between years 10 and 20 compared with other participants.” The actual denomination did not have a significant impact on the reduction of the risk of depression.

Those adults who have a higher risk of depression because either one or both of their parents have a history of depression “had about one-tenth the risk of experiencing major depression between years 10 and 20 compared with those who did not.”

The results of this study are consistent with results from previous studies.

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One Response to “ Christians 75% Less likely to Be Depressed ”

  1. Daniel Redwood, DC on November 20, 2012 at 5:02 pm

    I found the headline, “Christians 75% Less Likely to Be Depressed” fascinating. I went ahead and read the full text of the article in the American Journal of Psychiatry. I highly recommend this article and wish to thank Dynamic Chiropractic for bringing it to my attention. However, the DC headline about Christians being less likely to be depressed is not supported by the data in the study and the authors make no such claim anywhere in their AJP article.

    Everyone who took part in the study was a Christian, either Catholic or Protestant. The study found something worthy of note, which is that those for whom spirituality or religiosity was very important had far fewer depressive episodes.

    My own guess is that this would hold true for members of any religion or spiritual tradition.

    Daniel Redwood, DC

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